Echinacea – Cutting Cold and Flu Duration

Echinacea – Cutting Cold and Flu Duration

Cold weather and respiratory disease, including flu, go hand in hand. Research has shown that cold spells are reliably followed by upticks in the number of deaths from respiratory disease. Some of this may have to do with a few infectious organisms, like flu viruses, thriving in colder temperatures, but there’s also evidence that exposure to cold temperatures suppresses the immune system, providing opportunities for infections to increase. Natural therapeutics in the form of nutritional supplementation and immune-stimulating and antiviral botanicals can support the body’s natural defences, potentially decreasing the incidence of colds and flu, shortening the duration and decreasing the intensity of symptoms and preventing complications

Modern Medicine – May/June 2018

Antimicrobial Stewardship – Some Strategies

Antimicrobial Stewardship – Some Strategies

Antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) has been touted as one of the key strategies required in tackling worldwide escalation of antibiotic resistance. Although AMS has optimised antibiotic usage and reduced the incidence of resistance development in some regions, it is evident at present that the worldwide rate of antibiotic resistance development has shown no sign of slowing down whilst the global consumption of antibiotics continues to rise over the years.

Modern Medicine – May/June 2018

The Impact of Aging on Women’s Fertility

The Impact of Aging on Women’s Fertility

Infertility is common – approximately 10% to 15% of couples have difficulty conceiving a child. In young, healthy couples, the probability of conception in one reproductive cycle is typically 20% to 25% and in one year it is approximately 90%.1 An evaluation is commonly recommended after one year of unprotected intercourse without conception, the standard clinical definition of infertility. As women age, their fertility declines and the rate of miscarriages increases.

Modern Medicine – May/June 2018

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Assessment and Surveillance

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Assessment and Surveillance

Aortic aneurysms are a common incidental finding in elderly patients and are often asymptomatic. Common risk factors for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) include older age, male gender, smoking and hypertension. There is a strong familial prevalence of AAA and screening should be considered in patients with a familial history of AAA from 50 years of age. Ultrasound is a useful non-invasive investigation for initial diagnosis and surveillance of AAA. Once an AAA reaches 5.5cm in men or 5.0cm in women, the risk of rupture is generally greater than the risk of operative morbidity and mortality.

Modern Medicine – May/June 2018

Managing Lipid Abnormalities in Type 2 Diabetes

Managing Lipid Abnormalities in Type 2 Diabetes

Lipid abnormalities are present in over 60% of people with diabetes. The decision to initiate lipid lowering treatment should be based on absolute cardiovascular risk. Calculation of cardiovascular risk is appropriate in most people with diabetes. Statins are firstline therapy for prevention of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes. Elevated triglyceride levels are common in people with diabetes and treatment may be beneficial in some patients.

Modern Medicine – May/June 2018

Managing Polypharmacy to Reduce Adverse Events

Managing Polypharmacy to Reduce Adverse Events

The use of multiple drugs, often termed polypharmacy, is commonly defined as using from five to 10 prescription drugs. This polypharmacy is sometimes necessary but may be associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes.2 The US Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services estimated the annual costs of polypharmacy at over 50 billion dollars in America.

Modern Medicine – May/June 2018

Laser Drilling Tablets for Targeted Drug Release

Laser Drilling Tablets for Targeted Drug Release

Conventional drug delivery systems are known to provide an immediate release of a drug with little control over where the drug is released or the time period of release. Controlled drug delivery systems offer control over the drug release timing and target site. Osmotic pumps are a promising system for controlled drug delivery. These systems are used for both oral administration and implantation. Laser drilling is one of the most commonly used techniques to create a delivery orifice in the osmotic tablet.

Modern Medicine – May/June 2018

April 2018 Edition

We welcome you to come and read through our latest, April, edition of Modern Medicine.

This month we have a jam packed edition for you. Our features this month include; Opthalmology, Haemotology, Winter Ailment , Neurology and many more.

We encourage all of our readers to complete the CPD questionnaire for this edition, this can be done on the answer-form included in the magazine, or on our website CPD system.

Modern Medicine, the journal that’s with you wherever you go.

 

Iron Deficiency How to detect it, how to correct it

Iron Deficiency How to detect it, how to correct it

Measurement of the serum ferritin level is the most useful diagnostic assay for detecting iron deficiency
but interpretation may be difficult in patients with comorbidities. Identifying the cause of iron deficiency is
crucial. Referral to a gastroenterologist is often required. Faecal occult blood testing is not recommended.
A negative result does not impact on the diagnostic evaluation. Oral iron is an effective first-line treatment
and simple strategies can facilitate patient tolerance. For patients who cannot tolerate oral therapy or require
more rapid correction of iron deficiency, intravenous iron infusions are safe, effective and practical. Intramuscular
iron is no longer recommended for patients of any age.

Modern Medicine – April 2018

Chronic Rhinosinusitis Meeting the challenges

Chronic Rhinosinusitis Meeting the challenges

Chronic rhinosinusitis is defined by two or more of: nasal obstruction, mucopurulent discharge, decreased sense
of smell or facial pain, along with CT or endoscopic evidence of sinus disease. Consider differential
diagnoses according to symptoms; they include allergic rhinitis, headache syndromes such as migraine,
laryngopharyngeal reflux and globus pharyngeus. Once the diagnosis is made, commence a trial of maximal
medical management. If the patient does not respond to maximal medical management then referral to an
ear, nose and throat specialist is warranted for further investigation and medical and possibly surgical
management. Removal of the adenoids is often helpful in children with chronic rhinosinusitis.

Modern Medicine – April 2018