Safety of Azelaic Acid for Treating Acne during Pregnancy

Safety of Azelaic Acid for Treating Acne during Pregnancy

Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the pilosebaceous unit and is characterised by noninflammatory (comedones) and inflammatory lesions (papules, pustules, and nodules) that can cause scarring and psychological distress. In women who are planning pregnancy or who are pregnant, this condition can be particularly bothersome given the physiologic changes as well as the unpredictable nature of acne during this time. Azelaic acid shows benefits in the treatment of patients with acne vulgaris, rosacea, and perioral dermatitis.

Modern Medicine – Issue 5 2021

Managing Onychomycosis Needs Patience and Persistence

Managing Onychomycosis Needs Patience and Persistence

Onychomycosis is an infection of the nail unit caused by fungi (dermatophytes, non-dermatophyte molds and yeasts), presenting with discoloration of the nail, onycholysis, and nail plate thickening. Onychomycosis is the most common disorder affecting the nail unit and accounts for at least 50% of all nail diseases. Current treatment modalities of onychomycosis include oral antifungal therapies, topical antifungal therapies, and device-based therapies, alone or in combination.

Modern Medicine – Issue 5 2021

Microbial-binding Woundcare A Strategy to Lift Bioburden

Microbial-binding Woundcare A Strategy to Lift Bioburden

Wounds can be a source of infection by allowing unrestricted entry of microorganisms into the body, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. The use of wound dressings that irreversibly bind and remove microbes using their natural hydrophobic properties minimises cell destruction and the resulting release of damaging endotoxins and offers a novel approach that supports antimicrobial stewardship strategies.

Modern Medicine – Issue 5 2021

Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms ESMO Clinical Practice Guideline summary

Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms ESMO Clinical Practice Guideline summary

Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN s) arise from the diffuse neuroendocrine cell system and may occur at many different disease sites. Most frequently, these neoplasms occur in the digestive system, followed by the lung. The term NEN encompasses well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NE Ts) and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs). NECs represent only 10%–20% of all NEN s. The main focus of these guidelines is on sporadic small intestinal (SI)- NENs and pancreatic NENs (Pan-NENs) since these are the most prevalent NEN s at advanced disease stages. This is a shortened version of the original article.

Modern Medicine – Issue 5 2021

ESC 2021 Heart Failure Guideline Update

ESC 2021 Heart Failure Guideline Update

The European Society of Cardiology recently released their 2021 updated guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure. This article looks at the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The diagnosis of HFrEF requires the presence of symptoms and/or signs of heart failure (HF) and a reduced ejection fraction (LVEF ≤ 40%). Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment for HFrEF and should be implemented before considering device therapy, and alongside non-pharmacological interventions.

Modern Medicine – Issue 5 2021

Fenofibrate is an Effective Tool in Dyslipidaemia

Fenofibrate is an Effective Tool in Dyslipidaemia

Increased risk of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes is attributable in part to the high prevalence of associated risk factors including hypertension and diabetic dyslipidaemia, the latter characterised by elevated plasma triglyceride levels and low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Fibrates are used in patients with dyslipidaemia and high cardiovascular risk, where the greatest benefits of fenofibrate are seen among those with marked hypertriglyceridemia.

Modern Medicine – Issue 5 2021

Identifying Atrial Fibrillation Events Following Cryptogenic Stroke

Identifying Atrial Fibrillation Events Following Cryptogenic Stroke

In 20–40% of ischaemic strokes, a definitive cause is not identified, despite extensive evaluation1; this condition has been defined as ‘cryptogenic stroke.’ Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a well-known cause of ischaemic stroke and about 15% of strokes are attributable to a documented AF. Many strategies have been explored to improve detection of AF, ranging from in-hospital monitoring, serial electrocardiography and Holter monitoring and the use of external events (or loop recorders) or insertable cardiac monitors (ICM).

Modern Medicine – Issue 5 2021